Ökológiai Mezőgazdasági Kutatóintézet

Tomato research

Comparison of local tomato varieties

Read more...By their genetic variation and adaptability, local (Heirloom) varieties are remarkably valuable but they have been mostly supplanted in general cultivation as they have not met some of the requirements of intensive commercialized production. However, many local varieties possess positive attributes (resistance, rich flavor, nutritional value) that can make them successful in production on Hungarian organic farms. To verify this assumption, we have started an on-farm study to compare local tomato varieties from Central Hungary.

Study of four Central Hungarian determinate tomatoes

In 2013 we continue the on-farm study of local tomato varieties using experience from our 2012 trials. The huge interest in this trial required forming cultural regions across Hungary and the study of varieties characteristic of these regions also started. Besides farmers in Central Hungary, farmers of Southern Transdanubia and Balaton Uplands joined our research.

We continued the on-farm study in Central Hungary with the participation of 8 organic farmers. By request of the farmers’, local tomato varieties studied are all determinate and suitable for the food preservation industry. In parallel with our on-farm study, Dr. Anna Divéky-Ertsey (Corvinus University of Budapest Department of Ecological and Sustainable Production Systems), is surveying the nutritional value of the varieties which assists in establishing their use in the preserve industry.

Seed is provided by the Centre for Agrobiodiversity (Tápiószele). Production of seedlings is done at Corvinus University of Budapest Experimental and Research Farm – Organic Farming Department (Soroksár).

Farmers plant 20 seedlings of each variety. By keeping a simple protocol the following attributes are examined: yield, average weight, quality of berries, length of growing time, disease resistance, flavor, shelf-life, and fitness for processing.

Research of fourteen local varieties from Central Hungary – first steps of formation of the Hungarian organic tomato on-farm network (2012)

By their genetic variation and adaptability, local (Heirloom) varieties are remarkably valuable but they have been mostly supplanted in general cultivation as they have not met some of the requirements of intensive commercialized production. However, many local varieties possess positive attributes (resistance, rich flavor, nutritional value) that can make them successful in production on Hungarian organic farms. To verify this assumption, we have started an on-farm study to compare local tomato varieties from Central Hungary.

14 determinant varieties local to Central Hungary were grown out in the 2012 on-farm study. The seven collaborating organic farms could choose varieties to fit their practices from the provenance of the varieties. Seeds were provided by the Centre for Agrobiodiversity (Tápiószele). Seed is reproduced at Corvinus University of Budapest Experimental and Research Farm – Organic Farming Department (Soroksár). Within the framework of the PhD project of László Csambalik (Role of local varieties in ecological production – Case study based upon tomato), cultivation methods and nutritional value of these 14 varieties are evaluated along with 22 indeterminate local varieties. For an introduction to László Csambalik (scholar of ÖMKi) click here.

Provenances of the varieties can be found using the following links: Bugac, Cegléd (2 varieties), Cigánd, Dány, Farmos, Jánoshalma, Jászberény, Kozárd, Máriapócs, Monor, Szendehely, Újszilvás, Veresegyház. Control variety (planted by all farmers to compare with): Mobil.

Regions and participants increase for tomato on-farm study

Our on-farm study of local tomato varieties has become very popular with steadily increasing interest from potential participants in several regions. Farmers in Central and Southern Transdanubia have applied for selection as on-farm test partners in addition to compliment those already involved in Central Hungary. The Center for Agrobiodiversity helped locate test varieties from each farmer’s region that should be most suitable for their soils and climate. Between the Center for Agrobiodiversity and ÖMKi, seeds were obtained free of charge and farmers recieved seedlings for transplanting started at Corvinus University’s Budapest Experimental and Research Farm. The Center for Agrobiodiversity, ÖMKi, and BCE Department of Ecological and Sustainable Production Systems have a cooperative agreement to assess characteristics of these local tomato varieties throughout the growth and harvest period.

Certified organic farmers received 20 seedlings of each variety to trail while those working with ecological production approaches but not certified organic received 5 seedlings of each variety.  Participating farmers are required to maintain a reporting protocol developed by ÖMKi that tracks their experiences with all test varieties during the growing season.  This is done with a combination of written notes and photographs to establish a living record for future producers and research.  Growth characteristics, disease and pest resistance, and yield are tracked for each variety.  Collected data is summarized and evaluated at the end of the season.  Individual and summary data will help identify varieties best suited for growing conditions and market needs for farmers and plant breeders alike.

Read more...Red: Provenance of the local varieties
Yellow: Farmers from Central Hungary
Blue: Farmers from Southern Transdanubia
Green: Farmers from Central Transdanubia

This year 28 farmers participate in the on-farm study. They are linked by mailing lists which gives opportunity for continuous exchange of knowledge, information, and experience. A meeting will be organized in late summer to inspect the local varieties in different locations together with the farmers and further promote sharing of experiences.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Farmers of Central Hungary

Certified organic farmers:

  • Gabriella Fehér (Isaszeg), private farm

  • Antal Gódor, (Galgahévíz), Gódor Biokertészet

  • János Győrfi (Újlengyel), Bio-Élet Közhasznú Egyesület

  • Áron Pető (Szigetmonostor), private farm

  • Miklós Vidák (Galgahévíz), Galgafarm Szövetkezet

  • Daniella Vukovics (Tahitótfalu), Háromkaptár biokert

  • Edit Zöld (Szada), biodynamic farmer

Local varieties of Central Hungary:

  • ’Dányi’

  • ’Farmosi’

  • ’Jászberényi’

  • ’Szentlőrinckátai’

  • ’Kecskeméti 549’ (check variety) registered variety

Farmers of Central Transdanubia

Certified organic farmers:

  • Balázs Birkás (Szentbékkálla)

  • Sándor Gusztos (Hegyesd)

  • József Horváth (Szomód)

  • Adrienn Járosi, Gergely Kovács (Székesfehérvár), Két Kuvik Biogazdaság

  • József Kiss (Hegyesd)

  • Borbála Ware (Hegyesd)

Farmers with ecological approach, lacking organic certification

  • Csaba Kocsis (Kapolcs)

  • Róbert Freindl (Balatonrendes)

  • Mrs. Gyula Lukács (Taliándörögd)

  • Mrs. László Polgár (Monostorapáti)

  • Balázs Szabó (Kővágóörs)

Local varieties of Central Transdanubia:

  • ’Balatonalmádi’

  • ’Balatonboglári’

  • ’Bakonycsernyei 260’

  • ’Bakonycsernye 621’

  • ’Bakonycsernye 917’

  • ’Isztiméri’

  • ’Keszthelyi bőtermő’ (’Rich harvest of Keszthely’: old variety, superseded from production)

  • ’Monoszlói’

Farmers of Southern Transdanubia

Certified organic farmers:

  • János Bodó (Siklós)

  • Miklós Haffer (Mohács)

  • Andrea Kasza (Korpád)

  • Judit Mátrai (Bükkösd), Zöld Völgyért Egyesület

  • László Obreczán (Fiad), Ökorex-bio Kft.

  • Kálmán Vörös (Páprád)

Farmers with ecological approach, lacking organic certification:

  • János Görföl (Cserkút)

  • Gyula Köhler (Helesfa)

  • Péter Mislyenácz (Harkány)

  • Balázs Vajas (Bakonya)

Local varieties of Southern Transdanubia:

  • ’Balatonboglári’

  • ’Faddi’

  • ’Pécs gyöngye’ (’Pearl of Pécs’: old variety, superseded from production)

  • ’Tolna megyei’ (Tolna county)